CEC and Title 20 – New Regulations for Emergency Lighting

Newer Lighting Regulations have come to California under Title 20.  What is Title 20?  Who Created it? Keep reading to find the answer.

 

What is the CEC? The CEC (California Energy Commission) is the state of California’s primary energy policy and planning agency. It is focused on reducing energy costs and the environmental impacts of energy use—such as greenhouse gas emissions— while ensuring a safe, resilient, and reliable supply of energy. While the CEC has regulatory authority for most products sold or offered for sale in the state of California, its policies impact products produced for other regions as well.

 

What is Title 20? Title 20 is a part of the CEC’s Appliance Efficiency Regulations, from the California Code of Regulations.  The California Energy Commission adopted new standards updating the 2015 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (Title 20) for lighting appliances. The first updates to this set of Regulations was released in January 2018 and Tier 2 will be effective July 1, 2019.

 

Notably, this update adds standards for small-diameter directional lamps. The updated regulations incorporate elements of lighting product quality for both general service LED lamps and small-diameter directional lamps in addition to the traditional lighting appliance efficiency standards previously included in the regulations.

 

The addition of these new standards will require revisions to the California Appliance Efficiency Database product certification process, as well as updates to product labeling requirements for lamp marking, marketing material, and product packaging.

 

The lighting products currently in Title 20 that affect Emergency Light products for sale at www.exitlightco.com include:

 

 

Our products will contain a label in the “Features” section specifying if the product is CEC compliant.

 

Major changes include:

 

Updates to Lamp Regulations & Categories:
General service LED lamps are now regulated as a separate category from other light sources in the general service lamp category. New requirements include specific performance metrics and corresponding test methods to quantify product performance in an industry-recognized manner. Small diameter directional lamps with a diameter of 2.25 inches or less that are equipped with ANSI compliant base-types or the E26 base type are now regulated. New requirements apply to both low- and line-voltage lamps. Portable luminaires that are equipped with a socket requiring a general service lamp must be packaged with a compact fluorescent lamp or LED lamp that adheres to the updated lamp requirements.

 

California Appliance Efficiency Database:
The appliance database filing structure that manufacturers use to submit products for listing with the California Energy Commission will include new product categories and performance metrics starting January 1, 2018.

 

Product Labeling:
Manufacturers must test and certify their products with the updated regulations before including claims of dimmability, incandescent lamp equivalency, wattage equivalence, decorative lamp lumen output, or compliance with the Voluntary California Quality LED Lamp Specification in their lamp marking, marketing material, and package labeling.

 

A switch to led lighting met amazing results in one Indian Factory

This week in an “All Things Considered” story from NPR, we learned a good lesson in Energy Efficiency from a factory in India that switched its clothing factory from fluorescent light tubes to energy efficient LED lights. Generally, factories in India don’t have fans, Air Conditioning none the less. When a company representative visiting the factory realized the hot temperature that thousands of workers had to endure, he knew something had to change. The whole factory removed its fluorescent lighting, and replaced the factory with LEDs. What was the expectation of switching to LED lighting? The Company Representative stated : “Look, if you’re consuming a seventh of the energy, you’re probably dissipating something like a seventh of the heat as well.” It was expected that a swith to LED lighting would reduce the temperature inside the factory. What results did this experiment result in?

 

Switching to LEDs did indeed prove to reduce the factories temperature. The evidence shows that a switch to LED lighting reduced the temperature of the factory by over 4 degrees. This switch resulted in a boost in profits due to increased productivity, covering the cost of replacing the fluorescent lighting fixtures in just eight months. Not only that, but in a serious discussion worldwide over changing climate, manufacturing plants are a major source of energy consumption. As more and more factories switch to LED energy efficient lighting, we see this affecting the carbon footprint in a positive way.

 

As Emergency Lighting and Fire Safety Experts, we encourage all to consider their Emergency Lights and Exit Signs. When moving away from fluorescent or other types of energy inefficient lighting, you have options. One option is to use a Retrofit Kit to update your old lighting source into LED. The other and more popular option is to purchase a brand new Emergency Light or Exit Sign. Energy Efficient Exit Signs include LED Exit Signs, Power Free Exit Signs, and some of the newest technology, LEC Exit Signs. Feel free to use our Live Chat feature or call our Expert Customer Service Representatives if you have any questions selecting your new emergency products.

 

Real the original story from NPR here : https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/23/629871725/why-a-drop-of-4-degrees-made-a-big-difference-for-a-garment-makers-bottom-line

About Certification Marks

You see them on every piece of electronics you buy — whether for personal use, business, or work. But what does that stamped UL, ETL, or CSA indicate? These are Certification Marks, and they provide assurance that you can rely on a standard of safety and performance from the products. All products sold in the United States must pass through a battery of tests performed by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) to prove that the product meets or exceeds national safety standards. Products that pass this inspection and testing process carry the Certification Mark for the laboratory that provided the testing (UL for Underwriter’s Laboratories, ETL for Intertek Testing Services, and CSA for Canadian Standards Association). It doesn’t matter which mark the product carries, as long as it is from one of the organizations that are recognized by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA).

 

You can be assured that all products which carry an OSHA recognized NRTL mark will comply with the various safety codes (buidling codes, electrical safety codes, municipal codes and fire codes), has been thoroughly tested by third party laboratories to strict specifications, and complies with all current standards.

 

All emergency lighting and exit signs sold by The Exit Light Company carry Certification Marks. Please see our FAQs to learn more about Certification Marks and NRTLs.

The Exit Light Company Recognized Again for Providing Excellent Customer Satisfaction

The Exit Light Company Receives 2017 Spectrum Award for Excellence in Customer Satisfaction

It’s a three-peat! For the third year in a row, The Exit Light Company has been awarded with the prestigious Spectrum Award for Excellence in Customer Satisfaction.

 

The Spectrum Award of Excellence in Customer Satisfaction was established to spotlight companies and business professionals providing exceptional service and experiences to their clients and customers.

 

The Exit Light Company appreciates that our efforts at providing exceptional products with exceptional service are recognized. We will continue to strive for excellent customer satisfaction.

The Exit Light Company Expands Operations in the Mid-West

The Exit Light Company's Wichita, Kansas warehouse

The Exit Light Company is pleased to announce the opening of our newest shipping center in Wichita, Kansas. Our new mid-west facility allows us to provide affordable 2-day delivery service to most of the central United States. We have always prided ourselves on providing quality customer service, and one of our hallmarks is our fast turnaround from order to delivery. The new fulfillment center in Wichita allows us to reach even more of the continental United States with quick, efficient and affordable product delivery! And because we pay less on shipping, we can pass those savings on to our customers, or continue with our offer of free ground shipping on orders of 6+ items* to our customers (*Some restrictions apply). Our customers can expect our same world-class customer service, free shipping, but now can expect even quicker delivery!

 

The Exit Light Company Recognized for Providing Excellent Customer Satisfaction

The Exit Light Company Receives 2016 Spectrum Award for Excellence in Customer Satisfaction

For the second year in a row, The Exit Light Company has been awarded with the prestigious Spectrum Award for Excellence in Customer Satisfaction.

 

In partnership with The Stirling Center for Excellence, City Beat News (CBN) recognizes companies that provide an outstanding customer experience and honors them with the Spectrum Award. Winners are based on CBN’s independent, proprietary research and evaluation system, which identifies businesses with a track record of top-flight customer service and customer satisfaction. The rating system combines data collected from nominations, online and other customer reviews, surveys, blogs, social networks, business-rating services, and other honors and accolades — all of which express the voice of the customer.

 

The Exit Light Company appreciates that our efforts at providing exceptional service with exceptional products are recognized. We will continue to strive for excellent customer satisfaction.

Tragic “Ghost Ship” Oakland Warehouse Fire Shows Need for Stronger Life Safety Code Violation Enforcement

Another tragic fire at a large public gathering reminds us that life/fire safety issues can not be mitigated by laws alone. A horrific fire at the Oakland warehouse known as the “Ghost Ship” has led to the deaths of at least 36 people. The warehouse was used as a residence and art studio for many of the victims as well as a party venue. The building was zoned and coded ONLY for commercial use. In fact, there was a history of code violations. There are laws regarding zoning and life safety that were knowingly violated by the tenants at the Oakland warehouse. Life safety rules are designed to keep the public safe. Rules like keeping egress paths cleared, illuminated, and marked are basic life safety codes in modern society. Strict enforcement at the “Ghost Ship” may have led to fewer deaths or even prevented the tragedy. Complaints were lodged about the warehouse, but the wheels of bureaucracy turned slowly. Now, the District Attorney’s Office has launched a criminal investigation into the incident.

 

Our blog posting of February 4, 2013 “Surviving a Nightclub Fire” offers some advice about how to 1) avoid or 2) increase chances of surviving such an event. It also offers guidance for building owners/managers.

Ladder Safety

It’s a great day at The Exit Light Company, and we’re happy to present our weekly safety meeting topic – Ladder Safety. At one point or another, your employees will use a ladder of some kind. Whether it is a small step ladder or 12 foot long straight ladder, safety is a concern, and prevention through awareness the best way to address it.
For this meeting, it is beneficial to have a volunteer to show the proper way to climb a ladder. Before you get your volunteer and have them climb, make sure to check that your ladder is in good condition. There should be no broken, cracked or missing rails and they should be free of slippery substances on the rungs. Your demonstration should have your volunteer set up the ladder on solid footing, against a solid support. The base of the ladder should be about 12” out from the wall for every 4 feet of height.
Make sure your volunteer doesn’t have any oil, grease or mud on their shoes and have them climb the ladder slowly, facing it and using both hands. If tools need to be carried to the top, using a toolbelt will allow the employee to climb the ladder without needing to compromise the grip of the ladder. Have them climb back down the same way.
While reaching at the top of a ladder, do not allow sideways movement. If the desired object cannot be reached, climb down and move the ladder over. The ladder should be used by one person at a time, additional people on the same ladder may alter the balance and cause a fall.
Through your demonstration, employees should now have a much better understanding of how to properly use a ladder – and don’t forget – While on a ladder, never step back to admire your work!

Working Safely Around Electricity

This week’s installment of Topics for Safety Meetings addresses working safely around electricity. Although installation of exit signs and emergency lighting is nothing new to the certified electrician, many business owners choose to install units themselves or have maintenance workers perform the job. Safety when working with electricity extends to the average employee dealing with office equipment or even appliances in the breakroom.
First and foremost for anyone dealing directly with an electrical connection – shut the power off to the circuit you will be using! Standard voltage in the United States is 120 or 277 volts, which could produce an affect anywhere from a tingling sensation to fatal electrocution depending on the conditions of contact. Once the power is removed, use a tester to make sure the power is actually off to the location you are working in. Use the correct tools; for instance, use wire strippers when needed instead of a pocket knife or razor blade to minimize the risk of injury.
General safety measures when around or using electrical equipment include:
– Reading and following any instructions included with equipment
– Do not force a plug into an outlet that does not match the slot configuration
– Do not touch electrical equipment, plugs, outlets or switches with wet hands
– Grip the plug to remove equipment from an outlet instead of pulling the cord
– Although equipment may be “off” electricity is still present. Unplug before cleaning, fixing or inspecting unit and when not in use
– Do not touch equipment with possibly compromised circuitry (indicators include flickering lights, sparks coming from unit, buzzing noises)
Leave your meeting with a reminder – Accidents Hurt, Safety Doesn’t. Remember to bookmark this page or subscribe to our blog to receive next week’s topic for safety meetings.